Courses Description

Foundation Year Overview

By learning this subject, students will be able to develop intermediate English proficiency in the four macro-skills. More specifically, the students will be able to use intermediate-level tenses, grammar points, and vocabulary to communicate in spoken and written English fluently, accurately and appropriately, and to comprehend listening and reading texts effectively. The main textbook is New Headway Intermediate (fourth edition) by Soars.

Writing Skills 101 is designed for intermediate level students to enhance their fundamental sentence skills for academic writing. Students will be introduced to a number of academic writing conventions such as subject-verb agreement, types of sentences, clauses, and phrases. They will also learn how to avoid common writing mistakes such as sentence fragments, misplaced and dangling modifiers, and run-on sentences in order to construct well-written paragraphs in the next course.

Writing Skills 102 course is designed for intermediate level students to enhance paragraph skills for academic writing and written communication in English. Students will learn to write topic, supporting, and concluding sentences. Furthermore, they will be able to write different types of paragraphs: definition, process, descriptive, opinion, and narrative, and to compile a portfolio documenting processes and procedures they follow in writing those paragraphs.

This course enables the students to understand the different concepts of sociology and how they are related to development and to interpret the evolution of a society. It deals with the evolution of human beings and the creation of a society in human history in the world. Students will also be able to express in English their views regarding customs, traditions, beliefs, and religions clearly and logically and to analyze and reflect on crucial aspects of foreign cultures particularly in relation to Cambodian culture.

After learning this subject, students will be able to know the concepts, sources, and evolution of demography and to measure some demographic indicators such as birth rate, mortality rate, migration, and population growth rate and its consequences. Basic Demography (2013), a compilation of texts from various textbooks is used in this subject.

This subject is intended to prepare students for office work and formal communication in Khmer, mainly in a written mode, by introducing them to simple mistakes people make in writing Khmer texts and by teaching them how to use words and punctuation in sentences accurately and appropriately and spell commonly misspelled words correctly. It covers themes such as Parts of Speech, Word Classes, Sentences and Punctuations. Its main text is a handbook prepared by IFL Khmer Studies lecturers who are specialized in Khmer Literature and Linguistics.

The aim of this subject is to promote students’ understanding of Cambodia’s unique national identity through its history, which is one of the oldest in Southeast Asia and of the development of the histories of other countries in the region through interaction with outsiders, political tendencies and acculturation and cultural transformation. Students will examine, discuss and analyze the role of two great civilized countries in Asia, India and China, in influencing the region in the ancient time; how certain countries in the region emerged and developed their ancient and modern states before and after the emergence of Western Superpowers; and the rise in nationalism in Southeast Asia during and after World War II.

This subject covers a wide range of topics regarding global contemporary environmental issues including Environmental Pollution, Global Environmental Changes, and Natural Resources. Through intensive & extensive reading and discussions as well as frequent individual, pair, group & whole class work, students will be able to use language appropriately for various environmental contexts. The main objectives of the course are to (a) sharpen students’ language skills, particularly reading and speaking, and (b) broaden their understanding and knowledge of today’s global environmental issues.

In order to manage and process a huge amount of data, we need to know statistics. This subject will help learners realize that goal by introducing them to basic statistics. It starts with the concept of ‘data’: what it is and how it is collected and summarized. There is also a brief review of the basic concepts of probability. Students will study important statistical tools and their use by solving specific applied problems. Its other content includes describing data: frequency distribution, measures of dispersion, and normal probability distribution. The textbook used is Australian Business Statistics (3rd ed.) by Antony Selvanathan, Saroja Selvanathan, Gerald Keller and Brian Warrack.

Khmer Civilization is concerned with Khmer culture and how it has been influenced by foreign cultures since the ancient time. Its themes include the Relationship between Cambodian Culture and Foreign Cultures, Religions, Architecture, Arts, Beliefs, and Ritual Ceremonies. It aims at helping students to appreciate Cambodian cultural identity and distinguish it from foreign ones. In addition, students will learn how to promote Cambodian culture in the global context appropriately and know how to link it with some world and regional cultures. The course book is a collection of texts from various sources, including Cambodian Culture and History and Cambodian and Indian Cultures.

Year Two Overview

This subject aims to provide students with the opportunities to enhance their upper-intermediate English proficiency in the four macro-skills, including reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This subject aims to enable the students to demonstrate the ability to use English and to comprehend listening and reading texts effectively and efficiently. Moreover, the students will be able to develop their language skills, build confidence, work collaboratively, and utilize a number of soft skills such as problem solving, teamwork, leadership, presentation, time management, flexibility, motivation, patience, and persuasion.

This course is designed to better students’ success, retention, and proficiency in academic writing through composing multiple drafts of each essay type at the university level; to equip them with necessary academic writing skills such as paraphrasing, summarizing, quoting and documenting sources for extending academic essays to discuss a thesis with sound arguments and references; and to prepare them to write paragraphs/essays to describe and interpret graphs and tables. Students will learn not only writing strategies but also key words/phrases used in four types of essays including 1) narrative essay, 2) cause-and-effect essay, 3) compare-and-contrast essay, and 4) argumentative essay.

Exploring Literary Genres (LS201) is designed to teach Year 2 students English in context through various literary texts. This subject integrates language and content learning through short stories—the Necklace; Not Poor, Just Broke; Poison; The Hitch-Hiker; and The Rain Came. Literary Critical Analysis (LS202) is intended to enable Year 2 students to evaluate and critically respond to various literary texts. This subject integrates language and content learning through two stories—On Loan and The Village by the Sea. At the end of both semesters, students will develop their four macro skills, basic literacy, functional literacy, cultural literacy, and critical literacy.

These subjects are designed to teach Year 2 students English in context through the thematic approach and integrated language and content learning. Introduction to Development Issues (GS201) deals with such key themes as urban living, industry, tourism, development, and agriculture. Culture and Society (GS202) covers such key themes as culture and society, crimes, women’s issues, and politics. Students will develop their academic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through discussions, presentations, projects, and other types of written assignments.

Year Three Overview

Core English 3 (CE301 & CE302) deals with various macro skills in English language ranging from reading to writing. However, writing is dealt with more insightfully in the writing course. Core English is by itself integrative of those various skills in English. In addition, advanced vocabulary and grammar points are introduced to help students master the macro skills of the course.

Research Methodology 301 aims to equip Year 3 students at the Department of English with a sound understanding of research concepts in quantitative and qualitative approaches. It enables students to prepare a research proposal and to defend it before their classmates and lecturer.

Research Methodology 302 is designed to equip learners with knowledge and skills to conduct small/medium-scale research projects (e.g., a survey study, a case study, etc.). The students will finalize a research proposal, collect and analyze data, and write up a research report. The students will also present their research results in an open forum. This course prepares students for employment and further education that require research skills.

Creative and Reasoning Skills (LS301) is intended to enable students to become effective, independent language learners with the capacity to evaluate and critically respond to the texts. Its aim is to promote students’ basic literacy, functional literacy, cultural literacy, and critical literacy through text reading and analysis (using literary criticism theories such as Traditional Criticism, Psychoanalytic Criticism, and Marxist Criticism), idea expression in both speaking and writing (i.e., written essays and oral presentations), active listening and effective communication (i.e., participating in discussions with empathy, and assertive and non-judgmental behaviors). Students are required to complete their class work, homework, assignments and associated tasks. The selected studied texts are Romeo and Juliet and Letters from Thailand.

These subjects are designed to teach Year 3 students English in context through the thematic approach and integrated language and content learning. Social Issues (GS301) covers such key themes as population growth and urbanization, science and technology, environmental problems, wildlife conservation, poverty and economic inequality, and conflict, war and terrorism. ASEAN (GS302) discusses key themes such as history and evolution of ASEAN, how ASEAN works, ASEAN and Cambodia, ASEAN programs and activities, ASEAN links with the world, and ASEAN looks ahead. Students will develop their academic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills through discussions, presentations, projects, and other types of written assignments.

Critical Thinking (CT302) is intended to enable students to interpret, analyze, and evaluate ideas and arguments in fictions, non-fictions, daily life and academic settings based on a widely shared conception of critical thinking and basic skills and competencies displayed by good critical thinkers through reading texts (i.e. newspaper, media, literatures and research papers), class discussion, written assignment and presentations and listening to the arguments of others without prejudging these arguments.

Year Four B.Ed., TEFL Program Overview

The overall purpose of this program is to develop trainees’ professional skills in teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) at the secondary school level. It consists of the following components.

TM401 and TM402 are designed to develop students’ practical classroom skills, such as methods and techniques, in teaching English as a foreign language. They also help students to enhance the skills of materials development and assessment, enabling them to create useful and relevant learning materials and evaluate and construct classroom tests.

Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching (AM401) aims to provide teacher trainees with the knowledge and awareness of the approaches and methods used in foreign/second language teaching. It will introduce to them past and contemporary language teaching approaches and methods, which will assist them in uncovering the principles (thoughts and beliefs) that guide their actions as teachers. Teacher trainees who have taken this course will be able to provide the theoretical bases to justify the methods, techniques, and procedures they employ when teaching a second/foreign language.

TL401 aims to inform course participants of language and its basic components, characteristics of language learners and teachers, and introductory linguistic terminology. The course emphasizes the scientific study of language, including sound production and sound system, the linguistic structure of words and sentences, and meaning of language in social contexts. The second part of the course is to prepare participants for their teaching practicum and teaching profession by discussing the aspects of being successful language teachers and learners.

FE401 is aimed to build basic ideological, historical, and philosophical foundations of education for students. Much of the focus will be on developing their understanding of how different philosophical theories emerging in different historical periods affect education in the world. The emphasis will be on analyzing various sociological, political, economic, and ideological forces that influence the process of education in various settings. This course will also help learners develop the ability to interpret knowledge within its historical, philosophical, ideological, and social contexts, which will contribute to critical perspectives on education both within and outside the schools.

Second Language Acquisition (SL402) introduces students to major aspects of second language acquisition theories. The Course topics cover various factors that influence the successful acquisition of another language. The focus will be on linguistic, cognitive, personality and socio-cultural features of second language acquisition. In addition, the Course will also touch upon social contexts in which languages are learned or acquired and the relationship between language and the brain. Lastly, contrastive analysis will give students more knowledge of how linguistic systems differ.

This course introduces Year 4 B.Ed. students to ‘how people learn’ by exploring the fundamental concepts and applications of educational psychology. The course will empower prospective teachers through the apprehension of the contemporary themes in human growth and development, socialization, intelligence, and learning diversity. Such knowledge will assist teachers’ evaluation of teaching methods and techniques that influence the student learning outcomes; the instructional processes; the individual differences in learning; the gifted learners; and the learning disabilities.

This course introduces students—who are future educators—to issues surrounding education in society. The course reveals the complex relationship between schools and the larger society of which they are a part. Such issues of social equity from sociological lenses are extensively explored. This course asks students to critically examine the role of education in a broader social context. Students will examine the relationship between political ideologies and education, including how educational institutions are constructed and practices have evolved. Students will develop an understanding of lines of difference experienced by various social groups, and explore how schooling might be structured in ways that build equity and justice.

The practicum begins in Semester 2 and lasts for six weeks. Teacher trainees are expected to apply the teaching techniques and theories they have learnt in class to the real classroom situations.  Each trainee will work closely with an associate lecturer teaching at Foundation Year level and with a supervisor who is a faculty member of the Department of English.

Students who are admitted to B.Ed. by Research are required to write a complete thesis related to English language learning and/or teaching.  Each student is assigned to work closely with a supervisor who is a faculty member of the Department of English. Also, students who have successfully completed the thesis will be invited to publish their research findings in the DOE’s Cambodian Review of EFL Research or in a relevant journal, local or international.

Year Four BA Program Overview

The overall aim of these programs is to develop students’ English proficiency and professional English-related skills.

1. B.A. In English For Professional Communication

This program is designed to consolidate students’ English language skills and offer critical thinking, communication and collaboration, and social and cross-cultural skills, required in order to succeed in work and life in our increasingly integrated world in the 21st century. Specifically, the program is NOT intended for students who wish to be English teachers, translators/interpreters, or business people but to work more effectively and efficiently in an array of English-medium professional settings (particularly occupational ones).

This course is designed for Year 4 students who choose to specialize in professional communication. It aims to enable the students to understand the fundamental elements of a grant proposal such as the objectives, problems addressed, methodology, evaluation, budget and cover letter, in order to develop a professional grant proposal. The students improve their writing skills through proposal preparation and presentation of written work using their English ability. Moreover, they will be able to use their proposal writing skills in English in their future workplace in a professional manner. The course contains lectures, group discussions, consultations as well as practical sessions in order to equip them with knowledge and skills necessary for writing a project proposal.

Advanced English 401-402 aim to provide students with the opportunities to further enhance their English proficiency in the four macro-skills, including reading, listening, speaking and writing. This subject also aims to enable students to demonstrate the ability to comprehend spoken and written English and to comprehend listening and reading texts effectively and efficiently. Students will further develop their pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar skills. More importantly, they will have the opportunities to utilize their soft skills throughout the course.

This course aims to provide students with the foundational knowledge and abilities in handling people in a professional setting. Students will heighten their awareness toward the principal elements of human interactions and become well equipped to make a positive difference by taking their existing skills to a more advanced (professional) level. The course revolves around three main themes including personal effectiveness, interaction skills, and intervention skills. Scientifically proven principles of human communication are explored, discussed and critiqued through the lens of cultural context and situational differences.

Introduction to Globalization (IG401) will introduce students to definitions of globalization, its many facets, complexities, paradoxes, controversies, and effects. The fast-paced, rapidly changing, interconnected and inequitable context of globalization has a tremendous impact on cross-cultural or intercultural communication today. Therefore, globalization is defined as the complex web of forces and factors that have brought people, cultures, cultural products, and markets, as well as beliefs and practices into increasingly greater proximity to and interrelationship with one another within inequitable relations of power. Four facets of globalization—economic, political, cultural and ideological globalization—are examined with a focus on the intercultural communication dimensions of each.

This course aims to enrich the learners’ knowledge of communication beyond general settings and centers its focus on communication at the workplace. They will improve their oral and written communication skills through preparation and presentation of written and oral information. The course contents in the first semester include the forms of communication; how to deliver effective presentations; effective listening, negotiation skills and conflict resolution; and leading and developing an effective team. In the second semester, the themes involve developing job-seeking skills, managing and delivering quality customer service, and organizing meetings.

This course is designed for Year 4 students at DOE who choose to specialize in professional communication. It aims to enable the students to plan and write reports in a professional manner. It focuses on the key elements of writing and of presenting reports such as preparation, writing, editing, proofreading and presentation. Moreover, the students will learn how to assess their readership and tailor the content to their specific needs, compose targeted messages, structure their documents for maximum impact, and write clear and concise reports. The course also covers a wide range of report types to be used in business, non-governmental, or research fields in accordance with the students’ interests and needs. The course contains lectures, group discussions, consultations as well as practical sessions in order to equip them with knowledge and skills necessary for report writing.

This course is designed for advanced students to improve their linguistic competence and awareness of ethics and to practice their critical thinking skills. It will give the students practice in synthesizing theories, drawing inferences, forming interpretations and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of various ethical theories. Throughout the course, students will be required to use their critical thinking skills to evaluate the logical foundations and internal consistencies of ethical systems including their own. More specifically, we examine and evaluate existing social values and norms through the lens of the theories and principles from the course to determine their appropriacy given the dynamism of Cambodian society today.

Intercultural Communication (IC402) is a course in which students will be introduced to the process of communication between and among individuals from different cultures or subcultures. This course helps students become more effective in personal and professional interactions through better understanding of various cultures and their communication norms and expectations. Students learn how their own cultural backgrounds and values differ from others’, and identify the hidden aspects of cultures in order to deal with cultural differences.

Students who are admitted to P.C. by Research are required to write a complete thesis related to English language learning and/or teaching.  Each student is assigned to work closely with a supervisor who is a faculty member of the Department of English. Also, students who have successfully completed the thesis will be invited to publish their research findings in the DOE’s Cambodian Review of EFL Research or in a relevant journal, local or international.

2. B.A. In Translation And Interpreting

This program is designed for students who wish to become translators and/or interpreters. It also aims to enable students to learn different approaches to translation and interpreting, and gain insights into the nature of translation and interpreting, language, and cross-cultural communication.

The course aims to build necessary skills in the learners so that they can perform their written translation with good quality. Such skills as terminology management; English and Khmer languages; use of online dictionaries; the decoding of the source texts and the creation of the target texts through a multi-stage process involving the syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of both English and Khmer; and the verification of their translation products will be emphasized throughout the semester. Also, learners will have an opportunity to explore and discuss the histories and theories of written translation and relevant approaches.

This course aims to enrich the learners’ knowledge of communication beyond general settings and centers its focus on communication at the workplace. They will improve their oral and written communication skills through preparation and presentation of written and oral information. The course contents in the first semester include the forms of communication; how to deliver effective presentations; effective listening, negotiation skills and conflict resolution; and leading and developing an effective team. In the second semester, the themes involve developing job-seeking skills, managing and delivering quality customer service, and organizing meetings.

Introduction to Interpreting 402 will introduce students to consecutive and simultaneous interpreting techniques encompassing active listening, note-taking, coping tactics, and stress management while rendering interpreting services in both informal and formal forums. Learners will have enough time for meaningful practices of consecutive and simultaneous interpreting in and outside the classroom. Equipped with an updated sound system for interpreters, IFL-RUPP offers a conducive learning environment for students who desire to take up interpreting as their profession.

Introduction to Globalization (IG401) will introduce students to definitions of globalization, its many facets, complexities, paradoxes, controversies, and effects. The fast-paced, rapidly changing, interconnected and inequitable context of globalization has a tremendous impact on cross-cultural or intercultural communication today. Therefore, globalization is defined as the complex web of forces and factors that have brought people, cultures, cultural products, and markets, as well as beliefs and practices into increasingly greater proximity to and interrelationship with one another within inequitable relations of power. Four facets of globalization—economic, political, cultural and ideological globalization—are examined with a focus on the intercultural communication dimensions of each.

Intercultural Communication (IC402) is a course in which students will be introduced to the process of communication between and among individuals from different cultures or subcultures. This course helps students become more effective in personal and professional interactions through better understanding of various cultures and their communication norms and expectations. Students learn how their own cultural backgrounds and values differ from others’, and identify the hidden aspects of cultures in order to deal with cultural differences.

3. B.A. In English For International Business

Students learn to use English effectively and confidently for daily business transactions. They will be able to develop abilities in reading, writing, speaking and listening as well as basic terms and vocabulary used in the business community through a range of tasks that closely reflect the real world.

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of English used in business contexts. It enables the students to identify and to effectively use their English for various business sub-disciplines including management, production, marketing, finance and economics and so forth. Not only does the course assist the students in choosing the right language for business, but it also familiarizes them with the real-life tasks in business environment. They will be provided with opportunities to practice what they have learnt in simulations, role-plays, presentations and other work designs. At the end of the course, the students should be able to learn a pool of essential vocabulary central to different business operations, to acquire the knowledge of contemporary, global issues that affect business sectors and to excel in the four macro skills of English within the context of business studies.

This course aims to enrich the learners’ knowledge of communication beyond general settings and centers its focus on communication at the workplace. They will improve their oral and written communication skills through preparation and presentation of written and oral information. The course contents in the first semester include the forms of communication; how to deliver effective presentations; effective listening, negotiation skills and conflict resolution; and leading and developing an effective team. In the second semester, the themes involve developing job-seeking skills, managing and delivering quality customer service, and organizing meetings.

Introduction to Globalization (IG401) will introduce students to definitions of globalization, its many facets, complexities, paradoxes, controversies, and effects. The fast-paced, rapidly changing, interconnected and inequitable context of globalization has a tremendous impact on cross-cultural or intercultural communication today. Therefore, globalization is defined as the complex web of forces and factors that have brought people, cultures, cultural products, and markets, as well as beliefs and practices into increasingly greater proximity to and interrelationship with one another within inequitable relations of power. Four facets of globalization—economic, political, cultural and ideological globalization—are examined with a focus on the intercultural communication dimensions of each.

Intercultural Communication (IC402) is a course in which students will be introduced to the process of communication between and among individuals from different cultures or subcultures. This course helps students become more effective in personal and professional interactions through better understanding of various cultures and their communication norms and expectations. Students learn how their own cultural backgrounds and values differ from others’, and identify the hidden aspects of cultures in order to deal with cultural differences.